WICCAN, WITCH AND A WARDROBE

 

With the cheer of Christmas approaching, both myself and others have to deal with the inevitable Halloween-Blues. Goodbye pumpkins, goodbye treats and sweets, goodbye dressing up as anything you want without being judged because it is a mystical, magical night.

Alas, don’t fear- while Halloween may be over,ve a wickedly devilish sense of fashion style. In using on infamous witches in pop culture. Starting off, we have he Witch and The Wardrobes ‘Queen Jardis’. now while Jardis is called ‘The White witch’, I would stress to point out shed anything but good. Well, with the exception of her fashion sense. Jardis here manages to effortlessly encapsulate the winter wonderland . And while I would never condone the use of real animal fur, my god does she work a lion shawl. Sorry, Aslan- pain is gain, darling.

Moving on to – dare I say- an even deadlier opponenet, we are fac the most terrifyingly brilliant characters in ficitional TV. Welcome to the stage- Miss Bellatrix Lestrange! Bellatrix’s wardrobe- much like her soul- is black and morbid. We’re talking floor length gown, with hardered, stiff materials such as… And yet, despite all this terrifying… there,s still a sexy appeal there, somewhere.

 

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MONOCHROME vs HOLOGRPAHIC- a battle of trends.

Two main fashion trends emerging on the streets is monochrome and holographic.

Vogue has declared that this autumn/winter 2015- 2016 trend is monochrome. Vogue states “from complex geometrics to simple contrasts, this season monochrome finds power in its purity. At its most effective, the discipline of strict black and white is mirrored in clean lines and sharp silhouettes“. How could anyone go wrong with classic black and white? It’s simplicity is what makes it so elegant and beautiful. And yet, there are still many different monochrome styles and patterns for everyone to wear in different ways, so I do believe that monochrome will never go out of fashion. here I am slightly disappointed with vogue condoning such a classic idea instead of branching to something more enigmatic, something… different. Something holographic.

I will now admit and add a disclaimer that this will be a biased article. As a colourful individual, I feel fashion and colour are used to express everyone’s tastes and emotions, especially young people.

In Vogues Spring – Summer 2013 ‘The Shining’ issue, it declares “The sheen that features heavily in the spring/summer 13 collections has magical qualities. When hit by light, one colour becomes many, while the gauzy fabrics float about the body like a mystical glow“.  Francesca Burns, Vogue fashion editor. And I agree- everyone could use a little magic in their lives.

With the rise of social media platform ‘Instagram’, many of the popular users have branched into a more vibrant, colourful style. Armed with vials of glitter and pink paint tubes, my Instagram feed is bombarded with teenage girls being creative and artsy. This includes more holographic clothing. Much like the 50’s mods two tone style suits, holographic items are something edgy and different. Why have one colour when you can have two, or three. At first, i was reluctant. After being on tumblr and seeing a thousand different pictures of the pretty oil spills on the floor, I wasn’t sure about this latest fashion trend. However, after purchasing my first pair of Topshop platforms in holographic purple, blue and green, my opinion has been swayed. I have the fortune to live in Brighton, a town infamous for it’s quirky, original and diverse fashion sense. Donning my new platforms, I got many compliments on my unusual footwear. I have always worn fairly unusual things- while I admit, I never categorised myself as a ‘fashionista’, I chose individual pieces that I liked, and that works for me.

So, for me, holographic- with it’s unusual, interesting, lustrous aesthetic, wins this battle. Sorry monochrome- you’ll always be a classic, but it’s time for something different.

REVIEW: DRY THE RIVER – SHALLOW BED

Armed with a watered down, lukewarm beer in a plastic cup trying to find my friends, I stumbled upon an absolute gem of a band at Reading Festival 2013- Dry the River. I’ve had the fortune of seeing this band twice more after that- once again at Reading, a year later, and then finally a gig at Tooting tram in December. The interesting use of vocal harmonies across the band paired with finger-picked guitar, violins and intense crescendos showed me music in a way I’d never heard it before. This wasn’t just music, this was an experience.

Dry the River’s album ‘Shallow Bed’ can only be described as a treasure chest, full of exquisite, beautiful songs all incredibly special and unique. Lead singer/ songwriter Peter Liddle has a Godlike talent for creating an old-soul sound, contrasted with an experimentative youthfulness. Each song, while mysterious and enigmatic, has the blessing of not being terribly cryptic, and so I find a multitude of people can extract different meanings from the songs. With the same soulful melodies of bands like Sigur Ros and the lyrical genius of -dare I say- Bob Dylan, Dry The River provides it’s audience with something archaic yet fresh. One could say it’s…. riveting.The five piece British indie folk band all came from different origins, experimenting with more hard-core branches of music, but ultimately decided to take a more folksy, alternative approach.

 “The Dry the River sound is what you’d hear if you were in the bath after being dumped”
– Scott Miller (Bass & Percussion).
While not an incredibly glamorous statement, the melancholic sounds can generally be enjoyed whenever, but personally I would add it to an autumn/winter playlist due to the gentle melodies that match the simplistic beauty of winter weather vibes. The aesthetics of the lyrics create a deep, philosophical stance; a nice break from the bombarding of the repetitive, common pop music dominating the radio.
The use of biblical references combined with allusions to mythology and animal imagery sets Dry The River apart from other alternative bands singing of teenage heartbreak and smoking cigarettes *cough*.
Additionally, the lyrics break down the cliché stereotypes of discussing love via the medium of music in a poetic style, akin to Bon Iver. Pete’s angelic voice certainly adds to the heavenly aesthetics of the songs on ‘Shallow Bed’.
The luxurious innocence combined with dark themes form a truly imaginative album, and whilst Dry the River may not be the ideal band to listen to for a drinking session with your mates, it certainly adds something new to the up and coming alternative/folk genre of modern music.